Wait Until The Bugs Are Out!

With new technology, it’s best to wait until the bugs have been worked out…to wait until the “early adopters” have found the major problems and the company has had a chance to fix them.  We’ve seen this recently with the release of the iPhone 6 and the Apple watch. Now, Microsoft is offering PC users the opportunity to upgrade their operating system (OS) to Windows 10 for free and people may be wondering if that is a good idea. It’s not!

Microsoft’s wants it’s Windows 10 operating system to be installed on 1 billion devices within three years so it’s giving it away for free.  I doubt that this is going to be enough of an incentive for people to change. Even though Windows 10 will look very similar to Windows 8.1, people who use Windows 8.1 vividly remember how traumatic that change was, and will be hesitant to trust the new one. Windows 7 users are determined to avoid going through that.

People running Windows 7 or Windows 8, should already have had an invitation to “reserve” a copy of Windows 10.

If not, they can run Windows Update to see if any updates are available for their PC.  The one to they want is KB3035583.  This puts a small white Windows logo – the GWX, “Get Windows 10” app – in the system tray on the right hand side of the Taskbar.

Alternatively, they should be able to find the invitation by going to Windows Update in the Control Panel (via System and Security)

The point of “reserving” the upgrade

The point of reserving the upgrade is to allow Microsoft to download Windows 10 – probably 4GB or more – to PCs in the background over a period of time. It doesn’t want to download the code to 400 million PCs on the same day.   Even if someone reserves Windows 10 now, they may not be invited to install it for days or weeks after the official launch on July 29.

To cancel a reservation

Right-click on GWX, the white Windows icon on the Taskbar, select “Check your upgrade status” and then “Cancel reservation”.

How can People avoid Windows 10?

Nobody is forcing people to get Windows 10. If they don’t want it, they don’t have to reserve it or install it.

To remove the reminder, right-click on Start and select Properties. Next, go to the Taskbar tab, click the button that says “Customize …”, and find GWX, the Get Windows 10 app. The drop-down menu offers the option to “Hide icon and notifications”.

To go further, run Windows Update and click “View update history” to see all the updates installed. Look for KB3035583, select it, and then click to uninstall or change it. Windows will ask “Are you sure?” Just click “Yes”. It will never bother you again … unless you reinstall KB3035583.

Can they downgrade later if they don’t like it?

Microsoft aims to enable people to “roll back” to their old operating system, if required. However, I wouldn’t rely on this.  In any case, it would be wise to backup the old system before installing a new and use the option to create “recovery media” with the old system, so that they’re not totally dependent on the “roll back” working.  Remember, you, and you alone, are responsible for preserving your own data.

More details

The software which will begin rolling out July 29, will be offered as a free upgrade for all Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 PC and Tablet users.  (Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 operate 74.1 percent of all devices, according to NetMarketShare.)

Unlike Apple, who offers OS upgrades for free, the Windows free upgrade will only be available for one year…until July 29, 2016.

For those eligible for the free upgrade, the process will only grant you a comparable version of the software. If you had Windows 7 Home, you get Windows 10 Home. If you had Windows 8.1 Pro, you get Windows 10 Pro. For those who wish to upgrade from the Home edition to the Pro edition, a Windows 10 Pro Pack will cost $99.

Windows 10 will cost the same as its predecessor, Windows 8.  A copy of Windows 10 Home will run $119, while Windows 10 Pro will cost $199.  Copies of the software will be available online and in stores.  This option will be used by the minority of users who don’t have an eligible machine or wish to build their own computer and install Windows themselves.

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