Category: Tutoring

Facing Fears and Moving Forward

Victory laptopLearning new computer and gadget skills is as much about overcoming “fears” as it is about learning skills. Most of my clients express some version of “I feel so stupid, or I’m afraid I’ll break it, or I’m too old to be able to do this.” When we try new things for the first time we often experience fear of failure, but my clients inspire me everyday as they “step up to the plate,” face their fears and move forward! As they learn new skills they are empowered to take their personal lives and businesses to the next level:
  • consultants learn to use video conferencing

  • authors learn to blog

  • real estate agents learn to send contracts to clients for digital signatures,

  • coaches learn how to use Facebook groups to motivate and inspire their clients

  • Grandmothers learn how get grandkids photos from their smartphones to Costco for prints

These victories fuel my passion for my work and I’m so grateful for the opportunity!

Enjoy!

Mardi

Fear Not the F Word!

From my favorite business development program, www.BookYourselfSolid.com  As an educator, I always want my clients to know and accept that “there are no failures, only lessons.”   Enjoy!

How I Nearly Got My Mouth Washed Out With Soap

Ralphies-soap

Growing up in my family, we never talked about the F word. It was never, ever tolerated.

My mother was an especially difficult taskmaster. The mere possibility of the F word would incite her fury; and her condemnation. I could get my mouth washed out with soap!

The F word: Failure. Bad.

If I brought home a paper or a quiz with a B+, my mother would say, “That’s nice, dear. But it’s not as good as an A.” If I came home with an A, she’d smile and observe, “That’s wonderful dear. But it’s not as good as an A+.” A shadow would hang over a 99; after all it wasn’t a 100. (“Not good enough” was the message.)

While this spurred in me a drive toward perfection and excellence (and no doubt a bit of neurosis), it also deprived me of opportunities. I eschewed risk because risk could lead to failure.

I have come to discover – and appreciate – that there are no failures. Only lessons.

In his fascinating book, Black Box Thinking, Matthew Syed contrasts how failure is understood in the fields of aviation and healthcare. In aviation, pilots and teams are encouraged, without penalty, to disclose and report errors. Failures (accidents) are relentlessly scrutinized (often by analyzing black box data).

The information gathered is meticulously analyzed, clearly assimilated and rapidly disseminated so that ever more reliable systems and processes can be implemented. The culture surrounding the aviation industry expects and demands this; and the result has been that the fatality rate in aviation has plummeted.

Aviation accidents now are rare.

Health care, on the other hand, has demonstrated a culture of obfuscation when it comes to failure. It tends to deny and cover up its errors. Some physicians tend to have an aura of infallibility. The hierarchical structure discourages the questioning of a physician’s decisions. Bad outcomes are clothed in euphemisms. Incident reporting is often frowned upon, and sometimes punished. There is no standardized industry-wide error reporting system.

Preventable medical accidents are now rampant… and increasing. (By one estimate equal to a jumbo jet falling from the sky every single day!)

In aviation, failure is the opportunity to learn. In health care, it is a call to circle the wagons… and hide.

What will it be for you?

Too often, fear of failure has caused me to keep my head down, to play it safe. Too often I haven’t pushed the edges: Those edges where we grow. (And beyond those edges – oh my, that’s where the magic dwells.)

Too often, I have made failure personal, a sad story all about me. Rather than saying “It didn’t work,” I would think, “I didn’t work. Poor me.”

But what’s true is this: Great minds, great creators, great artists, great athletes, great innovators… they embrace failure. They seek it out. They see it as part of a magnificently generative process. They see it… as opportunity.

They know that the faster you iterate, the faster you fail, the faster you learn what doesn’t work, the faster your journey to success.

I have discovered, too, that following a tried and true formula like Book Yourself Solid® ensures faster iteration and reliable results.

By now, I have made a gentle peace with failure. I’m not yet courageous enough to seek it out. But when it shows up – as it often does – I sit it down and listen to it. I study it; and learn from it as best I can. And quietly remind myself that “it” didn’t work; that I’m ok.

Because I have come to know this: When we study failure – and learn from it objectively – we grow, our businesses flourish, and our lives become richer. When we fear and eschew failure, we deny our humanity, we narrow our potentiality, and we disserve our destiny.

There is a weary world that needs us, that desperately needs us to show up now, with those gifts and talents that only we can share, unburdened by any of our sad stories of inadequacy.

So fail forward fast.

And fear not the F word. It is the road to the business and the life you want.

Walt

Walt Hampton, J.D.
President & Chief Operating Officer
Book Yourself Solid® Worldwide

Passwords Can Be Simple and Safe

Passwords Can Be Simple and Safe

I know you hate having to use so many passwords.  It’s a big pain to keep track of them.  You might even be using the same password for multiple sites and allowing your web browser to save them so you don’t have to login every time.

A recent article by Kim Komando, inspired me to encourage you to take the bull by the horns, do some house cleaning and start using a password manager. This will make your online life so much simpler and safer.
Here are some great tips based on her article, One secret about online accounts every computer user needs to know

You may have created dozens of accounts that have only been used once. Just think of how many times you’ve created a username and password just to read an article, play a game or download something.  This can be dangerous because your information is floating around on dozens or hundreds of websites that may or may not be secure.  Even worse, if you have used the same username and password for every site, every account you have is in danger.  A hacker who gets your account information from one site can use it to get access to your other accounts as well.

The solution is to hunt down and close any accounts you are not using and then change the passwords to your existing accounts so that each one is unique.

A simple browser trick

1) When you create a new online account or log in to an old one, your browser stores the username and password. This makes it easy to log back in later.  It also means you can go now and see what accounts you’ve created.

2) After you locate your accounts, you can close down the accounts you are not using and create unique passwords for the sites you are keeping.

3) Then turn off “password storing” and erase the existing passwords in your browser. The option to erase the passwords is in the same place you view the saved passwords.  (The Instructions are below.)

Use A Password Manager

LastPass, The last password you will ever need

 

 

 

 

 

I know this seems like a lot of work but you only have to do it once.  Then, If you start using a password manager like LastPass all your unique passwords will be stored in a vault and you will only need to remember one master password.  The password manager will even generate secure passwords for you so you don’t have to think them up. You will love it!

If you need help to clean things up or to learn how to use a password manager like LastPass, I’m always here for you. Just call for an appointment.

Invite some friends to a Play Shop in your home, community room or office.  A play shop is a really fun way to learn and only costs $25 hr. per person.

Forward this tip to your friends so they will be safe and happier too.
Thoughts or comments about this topic? Please share in the comment section below.

Instructions for web browser applications:

FIREFOX

To see your login information in Firefox, go to the Firefox menu – it’s the icon on the right with three horizontal lines – and click Options.

Under the Security tab, click the “Saved Passwords” button.

Then click the “Show Passwords” button and click “Yes.”

CHROME

In Chrome, click the icon with three horizontal lines in the upper right and choose “Settings.”

Choose “Settings” on the left, and then click the “Show advanced settings” link at the bottom of the screen.

Scroll down to “Passwords and forms” and click the “Manage saved passwords” link.

If you want to log back into your old account, but don’t remember the password, then you can click on a password and click the Show button next to it.

To see the password, you will have to enter your Windows account password, which does make it harder for casual snoops to get in.

INTERNET EXPLORER

You can’t view saved usernames and passwords directly in IE. You would need a third-party program like IE PassView.  However, I recommend that you don’t use Internet Explorer anyway.  It is easily invaded by spyware. I use Google Chrome but Firefox is good also.

SAFARI

In Safari, go to Safari>>Preferences>>Auto-fill. Click the Edit button to view the saved passwords.

Need Help?

If you need help to clean things up or to learn how to use a password manager like LastPass,  I’m always here for you. Just call for an appointment.

Invite some friends to a Play Shop in your home, community room or office.  A play shop is a really fun way to learn and only costs $25 hr. per person.

Forward this tip to your friends so they will be safe and happier too.

Simple Fixes for Webcam Spying

Are you scared by all the news stories suggesting that hackers can spy on you through your computer and gadget cameras?

My mother has been really concerned about it and I understand how scary it can be.  It is almost overwhelming and really annoying when all these “advances” in technology bring new challenges and require more education!

You don’t need to worry though, I’m dedicated to calming your fears and giving you the information and help you need so you can relax and enjoy your toys again.

Despite the potential dangers, webcams are great tools for chatting long-distance with friends and family, and conducting  business.

When you understand how they work and how to secure them, you will feel much better and have more fun.  Enjoy!

Please help others by forwarding this to all your friends and relatives and encourage them to subscribe to my techie tips so they can be protected and have peace of mind also.  They can click right here to subscribe.  If you are into social media, you can use the sharing buttons provided. That will be a big help also. Thanks!

INTERNET-ENABLED CAMERAS  Internet Cameras

Internet-enabled security cameras and baby monitors are becoming more and more common because they are inexpensive and easy to set up.  These gadgets connect to your Wi-Fi network and they are a great way to keep an eye on kids, aging parents and your possessions.

However, many people don’t follow the directions when setting them up and leave the default username and password in place. Hackers have made it their business to know all the default login information for every gadget on the market.  If you don’t change the factory settings they could find your camera online, log in, and watch you or put you on a website with thousands of other cameras for curious snoops to browse.

Good News!
The solution is easy: just remember to change the default password when you set up any type of new gadget. If you buy a camera that doesn’t have a password, exchange it for a different model.

COMPUTER WEBCAMS  lamptop cam

Once hackers get on your computer, they can use programs to turn on your webcam without triggering alerts like the webcam light. Thus, covering or unplugging the camera when not in use is a good idea.

However, hackers could still have full access to your computer. They could rummage through your email, browser history, passwords, documents and anything else they want.

And, of course, when you do use the webcam, they can eavesdrop.

To get on your computer, hackers use a remote access tool, or RAT. That’s what tech support agents use to get on your computer remotely to change settings or fix a problem. Fortunately, remote access tools require your permission, so a person can’t just take control without your permission.

However, hackers have many ways to trick you into letting them on to your computer — fake email attachments, malicious links, Trojan viruses, and phony tech support calls.  Once you’re tricked into running a file, clicking a link, or inviting them on to your system, they can take control and do whatever they want.

More Good News!

The solution is pretty simple. Just avoid unsolicited email attachments and links, run up-to-date security software and don’t believe anyone who contacts you claiming to be tech support for a major company.

Operating systems on your computer may have a remote access tool (RAT) built in. This makes it easier for real tech support to get on your system, but it also makes it easier for a hacker to trick your system into letting them on.

To turn off Remote Assistance in Windows, go to Start>>Control Panel. In the Search box in the upper right corner, type “remote” and then click the “Allow remote access to your computer” link.

Uncheck the “Allow Remote Assistance connections to this computer” option and click OK.

For Macs, go to the Apple icon and select System Preferences. Click the Sharing icon and uncheck Remote Login, Remote Management.

If you use a company laptop, it could have similar software on it. Companies are supposed to disclose the presence of that kind of software but they don’t always do it, so if it doesn’t belong to you, be mindful of what you do on it.

smartphone cameraTABLET AND SMARTPHONE CAMERAS

Tablets and smartphones also have cameras but I haven’t heard of any malicious apps or spying apps that can trigger the camera.  That doesn’t mean they don’t exist, or won’t exist in the future but I will let you know if that changes.

A word to the wise….if there is something you really don’t want the world to see, don’t put it on your smartphone or tablet.

If you have any questions or comments about this or if you have any suggestions for future tips, please post a comment below and let me know. I always love to know what you think and how I can help you. Thanks!

Help Others Enjoy The Benefits of Modern Technology

$10 Gift Certificates for You!

When someone refers me a new client, I always send them a gift certificate for my services.

The certificates are transferable if you prefer to “re-gift” them.

Please help me with my mission to help everyone enjoy the many benefits of computer and gadget technology.  Thanks!

Gift Me To Your Friends and Family

Gift Me! 

I always have gift certificates.  Herald in more peace and joy to the world this year by gifting computer or gadget Tutoring!Before you purchase a techie gift for someone, consider booking a consultation with me about the best gadget for their needs.

New Package Deals!

Pay in advance for 4 or more hours and save 10%.

Buying a 4 hour package for $180 saves you $20.  That’s only $45 per hr.  (The hours can be used one or two at a time as you like.)

The Regular In-home, tutoring rate is now $50 hr. (1 hr. min)

There is no longer a 1.5 hour minimum requirement so you save $10 over last season’s rates, if you only need a one hour session.

Tutoring for businesses is $60 hr.  The same package deal is available. Save 10% by purchasing 4 hours or more at one time. Use 1-2 hours at a time, any time.  A 4 hour package saves you $25 and reduces the hourly to $54.

And remember the remote option for quick questions.
(See the article below.)

Convenient & Affordable New Service for You!

Convenient & Affordable
New Service for You!join.me

From time to time, clients have said they wished they could have me on a “retainer” to answer a quick question or get them out of a jam.  We have discussed a subscription service where people would pay a monthly fee, but most people wouldn’t need help every month. This week, the subject came up again and my clients said they would love to be able to “pay as needed”  They suggested that I charge $60 hr. (to keep the math simple) and bill in 15 min increments (to make it worth my time).  I thought it was a great idea and a real win-win solution. I’m excited to be offering this this as a new service.

I will be happy to answer your questions on the phone, by remote access into your computer, or by email. This is a great option for people who need some help, but don’t need a whole one-hour appointment in their home.  Bring me all those niggling questions and frustrations and let’s get you back to full enjoyment of your techie tools.  Call me today for an appointment!

Now Offering – Remote Tutoring!

Now Offering – Remote Tutoring!

join.meI’m now offering remote tutoring on your computer or tablet for $50 hr.  

I had hoped to do smart phones and iPods too, but there isn’t an app for that yet.  For now, we can do your computers and tablets and there’s lots of fun things to learn on those.

It’s really easy!  You go to join.me, enter my code and join me for our meeting on your device.  I will be able to use your curser and show you how to do things. Then you can take “the Presenter role” and show me.  I will watch and coach as needed.  I think you will really enjoy it.  Call for an appointment today and try it.

FYI for Current Users of Apple iPhone, iPad and iPod

FYI:  For Current Owners of Apple Gadgets:

Ipad And Iphone

The iOS 8 update is available now for users of iPhone 4 and later, iPad 2 and later, iPad mini and later, and iPod touch (fifth generation).

You may have to delete some things in order to have enough memory to install the update.  It can take quite a bit of time to look at your apps’ usage and decide what to delete.  (Go to Settings > General > Usage)

I had to dump 2 GB on my iPhone 4s.  I chose to keep my music for my workouts and dump a lot of photos. I also dumped a bunch of apps I wasn’t using very often.  I didn’t care about them anyway so it was a good incentive for me to do some clean up. I will run the update and report back in next week’s Techie Tip.

%d bloggers like this: